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Upcoming Events

November CIC Research Seminar 2

Date: November 20, 2019

Time: 3:00 - 4:30 pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth - Building 216 Room 204, Level 2 Curtin University, Bentley Campus

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November CIC Research Seminar 2

Artificial Intelligence – perception, expectations, and reality

Presented by Prof Lars Nolle

Abstract:

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has become part of the modern pop culture and is featured in many science fiction books or films, often together with evil robots or artificial lifeforms. This led to a certain perception of AI in the general public, frequently associated with menace and loss of control. Based on that perception, even well respected scientists and entrepreneurs from non-AI backgrounds, like Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk, have warned that AI poses a threat to our very existence. In contrast, there are technology evangelists who now sell AI as the solution to all our problems. This again changed the perception of AI in the general public and increased the expectations people have. As a result, even big technology companies started to use the term Artificial Intelligence as a marketing buzzword, highlighting capabilities instead of threats. There is a huge gap between AI as perceived by laymen and what is actually happening in the AI community. In this talk we shall look at the different interpretations of the term AI before discussing potential dangers, threats and capabilities of Artificial Intelligence.

Bio:

Lars Nolle graduated from the University of Applied Science and Arts in Hanover, Germany, with a degree in Computer Science and Electronics. He obtained a Postgraduate Diploma in Software and Systems Security and an MSc in Software Engineering from the University of Oxford as well as an MSc in Computing and a PhD in Applied Computational Intelligence from The Open University.

He worked in the software industry before joining The Open University as a Research Fellow. Subsequently, he became a Senior Lecturer in Computing at Nottingham Trent University and is now a Professor of Applied Computer Science at Jade University of Applied Sciences.

After serving two years as Associated Dean of Research, Lars is currently Dean of Studies at the Department of Engineering Sciences. He is also currently President of the European Council of Modelling and Simulation. Lars’ main research interests are artificial intelligence methods for real-world scientific and engineering applications

The one hour presentation will be followed by a networking opportunity.

December 2019 Software Carpentry Workshop – Python and R

Start date: December 4, 2019

End date: December 6, 2019

Time: 9am-5pm

Location: Curtin University, Bentley Campus

December 2019 Software Carpentry Workshop – Python and R

The course is aimed at postgraduate students and researchers who want to learn more about automation and reproducibility of their research. You don’t need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Course Content:

  • Introduction to the Unix Shell
  • Introduction to version control (using Git)
  • Data analysis and visualisation in Python
  • Data analysis and visualisation in R

 


Past Events

If you are interested in any further information on our past events feel free to contact the CIC team.

RNT November 2019

Date: November 14, 2019

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

RNT November 2019

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regularly joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

November CIC Research Seminar

Date: November 13, 2019

Time: 1:00 - 2:30 pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth - Building 216 Room 204 Level 2, Curtin University, Bentley Campus

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November CIC Research Seminar

Statistical challenges in identifying genetic component to depression

Presented by Prof Cathryn Lewis

Abstract:

The human genome comprises millions of genetic variants that are inherited within families. Many variants contribute to our risk of developing a disease, or play a role in continuous traits such as height or cholesterol level. Genetic data is a statistical goldmine and in the last decade, we have made great strides in uncovering the genetic predisposition to many disorders through genome-wide association studies. These studies have shown that most major public health problems are polygenic, with risk conferred by the combined effects of multiple genetic variants. Our most recent studies have identified 102 genetic variants, but these account for only a small proportion of trait variance, and of the genetic contribution.

Statistical challenges in these studies include:

1. Choice of relevant phenotype definition, for example, clinical diagnosis or number of depressive symptoms

2. Analysis strategies for millions of variants genome-wide using regression methods or machine learning methods.

3. Dissecting genetic correlations between disorders from shared variants

4. Prediction studies, from polygenic risk scores combining risk variants

In this talk, I will describe our studies to identify the genetic component to major depressive disorder. I will give an overview of the role of statistics in gene discovery, and highlight the opportunities in methodological and analytical statistical research based on the rich data arising from biological studies.

Bio:

Cathryn Lewis is Professor of Genetic Epidemiology and Statistics, with a split post across the Division of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (School of Medicine) and the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre (Institute of Psychiatry).

She leads King’s College London’s Statistical Genetics Unit, a cross-school group to develop and support methods in statistical genetics, with a particular focus on complex traits. She has held an academic post at King’s College London School of Medicine since 1996. Previously, she was at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, and completed her PhD in Statistics at the University of Sheffield.

The one hour presentation will be followed by a networking opportunity.

October CIC Research Seminar 2

Date: October 30, 2019

Time: 1:30 - 3:00 pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth - Building 216 Room 204, Level 2 Curtin University, Bentley Campus

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October CIC Research Seminar 2

Toward more comprehensive search systems for research and learning

Presented by Ben Adams

Abstract:

Modern search engines are optimized for efficiency-to give users answers almost before they ask for them. However, some complex search behaviour is not well-served by current search engines, especially when users are engaging in slower, more creative search tasks such as research or critical learning. In this talk, Ben will discuss two current research projects he is working on to develop comprehensive search systems that facilitate more exploratory modes of searching for information. The first project is a spatiotemporal search engine for exploratory search through historical and geographic lenses. The second project is focused on developing interactive narrative-based systems in mobile settings. Ben will conclude with some thoughts on how comprehensive search might help us rethink how we organize our scientific research outputs for better uptake and reuse.

Bio:

Ben Adams is a senior lecturer in Computer Science at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. His research focuses on how we can organize and represent geographic, historical, social, and scientific knowledge to better promote synthesis and learning by users. The research he undertakes is both explanatory and constructive. In the first case he develops theories to explain how the information that we produce and share in digital form reflects human conceptualizations of the world. In the second case he builds software tools that help people use geographic information better to solve problems. Adams currently serves as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Spatial Information Science (JOSIS).

The one hour presentation will be followed by a networking opportunity.

October CIC Research Seminar

Date: October 17, 2019

Time: 2:30 - 4:00 pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth - Building 216 Room 204, Level 2 Curtin University, Bentley Campus

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October CIC Research Seminar

A statistical journey through imagery from mass spectrometry, fMRI and towards the sky

Presented by Professor Inge Koch

Abstract:

Since the beginning of the 20th century, Pearson, Hotelling (and very many others since then) have worked with multivariate data in order to find patterns and structure in such data and to summarise their data in simpler forms. Towards the end of the 20th century one of the early methods, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), enjoyed renewed interest and has since become an area of high research activity and probably the main exploratory tool for analysing high-dimensional data.

In this talk, Professor Koch begins with a little history relating to PCA and then describes some of today’s uses of PCA that she is involved in: in the analysis of proteomics mass spectrometry data used in cancer research; in the detection of sparse signals obtained in functional data of fMRI images of brain scans and their relationship to maths anxiety and in surveys of the sky as available from the square kilometer array and other telescopes.

Bio:

Inge Koch was appointed Professor of Statistics and Data Science in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, UWA, and started this position in early 2019. Inge’s research focusses on multivariate and high-dimensional data, analysis of such data, and application of new statistical approaches to diverse domains. She is interested in statistical learning and in particular in dimension reduction and feature extraction, clustering and classification and sparsity. She has been collaborating with medical researchers and biochemists on flow cytometry in the detection and progression of diseases, on challenges in cancer research using proteomics mass spectrometry, with electrical engineers on signal processing of fMRI images, and with astronomers on source detection of astronomy surveys.

As head of Statistics and Data Science at UWA and in her previous work at other Australian universities, Inge has been active in encouraging young women to study and take up careers requiring mathematics. From mid-2015 to early 2019, Inge has been the Executive Director of the Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute and its BHP-funded CHOOSEMATHS program which aims to increase participation of girls and young women in mathematics and STEM.

The one hour presentation will be followed by a networking opportunity.

RNT October 2019

Date: October 10, 2019

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

RNT October 2019

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regularly joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

RNT September 2019

Date: September 12, 2019

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

RNT September 2019

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regularly joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

August CIC Research Seminar 4

Date: August 28, 2019

Time: 2:30 - 4:00 pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth - Building 216 Room 204, Level 2 Curtin University, Bentley Campus

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August CIC Research Seminar 4

Household Portfolio Allocation, Uncertainty, and Risk

Presented by Professor Sarah Brown

Abstract:

Analysing the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the Health and Retirement Study, we investigate the extent to which US households reduce their financial risk exposure when confronted with background risk. Our novel modelling approach, termed a deflated ordered fractional model, quantifies how the overall composition of a household portfolio with three asset classes adjusts with background risk, and is unique in recovering for any given risky asset class the shares that are reallocated to each safer asset category. Background risk exerts a significant impact on household portfolios, inducing a flight from risk, from riskier to safer assets.

Bio:

Sarah graduated from the University of Hull (1989), gained her MA in Economics at the University of Warwick (1990) and her PhD from the University of Loughborough and was appointed to a lectureship there (1994). She gained promotion to a senior lectureship in 2001 at University of Leicester. In 2005, she accepted a position as Chair in Economics at the University of Sheffield and was Head of Department 2006-2011. She is a director of the Institute for Economic Analysis of Decision-making (InstEAD), a Research Fellow at the IZA (Institute for the Study of Labour, Bonn) and an Associate Fellow at the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute (SPERI). She has been a member of the Department for Work and Pensions Steering Committee for the Work, Pensions and Labour Economics Study Group (WPEG) since 2001.

Sarah was a member of the Grant Assessment Panel C of the Economic and Social Research Council 2010-2013, member of the Research Excellence Framework 2014, Economics & Econometrics Sub-Panel, member of the Women’s Committee of the Royal Economic Society 2010-2015, member of the Steering Group of the Royal Economic Society Conference of Heads of University Departments of Economics 2010-2016 and member of the Royal Economic Society Council 2013-2018.

Sarah’s research interests lie in the area of applied microeconometrics focusing on labour economics including wage determination, the economics of education and household finances including financial decision-making and vulnerability over time. In 2012 Sarah was awarded a two-year Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellowship for a project entitled Household Finances, Intergenerational Attitudes and Social Interaction. Since March 2015, Sarah has been an Independent Member of the Low Pay Commission, which is the independent body that advises the UK government on the National Living Wage and the National Minimum Wage.

Networking opportunity will follow the presentation.

August CIC Research Seminar 3

Date: August 21, 2019

Time: 1:00 - 2:00 pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 Room 204, Bentley Campus, Curtin University

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August CIC Research Seminar 3

Improving the Success of Your Supercomputing Applications

Presented by Professors Julian Gale, Andrew Rohl, and Igor Bray

Abstract:

For many Curtin Institute for Computation researchers, access to supercomputing resources is critical. In Australia, we are reasonably well served by two national supercomputing centres; NCI and Pawsey. Although both centres are currently in the midst of upgrades, competition for access is increasing every year as more and more researchers turn to supercomputing as part (or all!) of their workflow. Curtin researchers traditionally have done well in being successful in attracting large amounts of supercomputing time in competitive allocations, although this has been through a relatively small number of research groups. In this seminar we will cover:

  • What resources are available
  • What schemes you can apply for
  • How to write a good application for each scheme
  • Strategies for maximising your success
  • Where to get help with your proposal

Note that the major schemes are all running significantly earlier this year; 2nd August to 20th September. This seminar has been timed so that you have plenty of time to put your learnings into practice!

Speakers:

Julian Gale is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Computational Chemistry. He served on the National Computational Merit Allocation Committee for 12 years and was Chair of the committee for the final two years.

Andrew Rohl is the Director of the Curtin Institute for Computation and the former Director of iVEC (now the Pawsey Centre). He is the outgoing chair of the Pawsey Partner Merit Allocation Committee and has been a member of the National Computational Merit Allocation Committee.

Igor Bray is a John Curtin Distinguished Professor and Head of Physics and Astronomy at Curtin. He is currently on the National Computational Merit Allocation Committee and has been using Australia’s supercomputing resources since the late 1980s, typically obtaining around 10M SU annually.

August CIC Research Seminar 2

Date: August 13, 2019

Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

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August CIC Research Seminar 2

Advanced data mining approaches to time-ordered data; with a focus on text mining and sequential patterns

Presented by Professor Maguelonne Teisseire

Abstract:

Data is usually heterogeneous, multiscale, spatial and temporal (time series of satellite images, digital terrain models, physical ground measurements, mobility databases, qualitative observations, tweets, news, scientific papers, etc.). Exploitation by experts of these huge volumes of complex data (big data) requires not only to structure it to the best methods, but also and mainly, to design data analysis and knowledge discovery methods.

Bio:

During this presentation, I will give an overview of my research works on multimodal data mining (sequential patterns, spatial analysis, text mining) with a particular focus on environmental and health applications. Maguelonne Teisseire is currently a Research Professor-Irstea and joined the TETIS laboratory in

March 2009 where she has been Head of Information System and Knowledge Discovery Group since. She received a Ph.D. in Computing Science from the Méditerranée University, France, in 1994, with research interests focused on behavioral modeling and design. During 1995- 2008, she was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering in Montpellier II University and Polytech’Montpellier, France, was Head of the Computer Science Department during 2006 to 2008 and headed the Data Mining Group at the LIRMM Laboratory Lab, Montpellier, France, from 2000 to 2008.

Her current research interest focus on advanced data mining approaches when considering that data are time ordered. She is particularly interested in text mining and sequential patterns. Her research takes part on different projects supported by either the National Government (RNTL) or regional project. She has published numerous papers in refereed journals and conferences on either behavioral modeling or data mining.

The presentation will be followed by a networking opportunity.

RNT August 2019

Date: August 8, 2019

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

RNT August 2019

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regularly joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO