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Upcoming Events

There are no upcoming events.

 


Past Events

If you are interested in any further information on our past events feel free to contact the CIC team.

Hacky Hour

Date: December 5, 2018

Time: 3pm - 4pm

Location: Library Makerspace, Level 5

Hacky Hour

Hacky Hour is a weekly meetup designed to help build a community around data and/or computing driven research. Everyone is welcome to drop-in to work on problems related to code, data, or digital tools in a social environment.

We have weekly lightning talks about various topics and regular guest visits from Pawsey and to sweeten the deal we will provide biscuits as well.

Follow @CUHackyHour for updates and info on guests and talk topics.

No RSVP necessary, just rock up!

RNT December 2018

Date: December 4, 2018

Time: 2pm - 3pm

Location: B216:204 - Innovation Central Perth

RNT December 2018

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regulary joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

Hacky Hour

Date: November 28, 2018

Time: 3pm - 4pm

Location: Library Makerspace, Level 5

Hacky Hour

Hacky Hour is a weekly meetup designed to help build a community around data and/or computing driven research. Everyone is welcome to drop-in to work on problems related to code, data, or digital tools in a social environment.

We have weekly lightning talks about various topics and regular guest visits from Pawsey and to sweeten the deal we will provide biscuits as well.

Follow @CUHackyHour for updates and info on guests and talk topics.

 

No RSVP necessary, just rock up!

CIC seminar November 2018

Date: November 28, 2018

Time: 2pm - 3pm

Location: B211:226

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CIC seminar November 2018

Using data and data science to overcome court delays in the NSW criminal justice system: A smarter way of averting injustice?

Presented by Dr Don Weatherburn

 

Abstract:
For nearly 50 years, the Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOCSAR) has been using administrative records from the NSW criminal justice system to investigate a wide range of crime and social policy issues in NSW. A pressing issue in NSW (and elsewhere) is the growing backlog of cases to be dealt with by the NSW District Criminal Court. This backlog not only creates delays in the administration of justice but also places pressure on the prison system.  Record levels of people in NSW prisons have been attributed in part to a large growth in the number of remandees (that is, people awaiting trial or sentence). To help understand and solve this issue, the Bureau recently developed a simulation model of the District Criminal Court of NSW. The model enables users to test the effects of various initiatives in reducing trial court delay.

In his presentation, the Director of BOCSAR, Dr. Don Weatherburn will describe the development and use of this model. Different scenarios to reduce court delay are explored using the model; including increasing the number of judges, reducing the number of late guilty pleas, reducing the number of adjournments and eliminating mid-year vacation periods of the court. Without preventative action, the model predicts that the backlog in cases would increase a further 13% by December 2019. Given the importance of reducing the case backlog in NSW courts and the risks associated with implementing untested strategies for dealing with the problem, it is vital to have some means of assessing the likely effect of alternative strategies.  Using data and data science appears to be a smart way of tackling this issue.

 

Bio:

Don Weatherburn has been Director of the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research since 1988. He was awarded a Public Service Medal in January 1998, an Alumni Award for Community Service by the University of Sydney in 2000 and made a fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia in 2006. He is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Social Science at the University of New South Wales, a Visiting Fellow at the Australian National University and has published three books and more than 200 peer-reviewed articles, reports, and book chapters on crime and criminal justice.

Don’s visit to Curtin University is being sponsored by the Curtin Institute for Computation (under the Visiting Scholar program).  He is being hosted by the Health Research and Data Analytics hub within the Faculty of Health Sciences.

Hacky Hour

Date: November 21, 2018

Time: 3pm - 4pm

Location: Library Makerspace, Level 5

Hacky Hour

Hacky Hour is a weekly meetup designed to help build a community around data and/or computing driven research. Everyone is welcome to drop-in to work on problems related to code, data, or digital tools in a social environment.

We have weekly lightning talks about various topics and regular guest visits from Pawsey and to sweeten the deal we will provide biscuits as well.

Follow @CUHackyHour for updates and info on guests and talk topics.

No RSVP necessary, just rock up!

Hacky Hour

Date: November 14, 2018

Time: 3pm - 4pm

Location: Library Makerspace, Level 5

Hacky Hour

Hacky Hour is a weekly meetup designed to help build a community around data and/or computing driven research. Everyone is welcome to drop-in to work on problems related to code, data, or digital tools in a social environment.

We have weekly lightning talks about various topics and regular guest visits from Pawsey and to sweeten the deal we will provide biscuits as well.

Follow @CUHackyHour for updates and info on guests and talk topics.

No RSVP necessary, just rock up!

CIC Visitor Seminar November 2018

Date: November 9, 2018

Time: 2pm – 3pm

Location: B216:204 - Innovation Central Perth

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CIC Visitor Seminar November 2018

Atmospheric carbon and the statistical science of measuring, mapping, and uncertainty quantification

Distinguished Professor Noel Cressie

Abstract:
Too much carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is a threat to long-term sustainability of Earth’s ecosystem. Atmospheric CO2 is a leading greenhouse gas that has increased to levels not seen since the middle Pliocene (approximately 3.6 million years ago).

One of the US National Aeronautics Space Administration’s (NASA) remote sensing missions is the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, whose principal science objective is to estimate the global geographic distribution of CO2 sources and sinks at Earth’s surface, through time. This starts with the measurement of radiances from soundings, moves on to retrievals of the atmospheric state, from which maps of gap-filled and de-noised geophysical variables and their uncertainties are made. With the aid of a model of transport in the atmosphere, CO2 fluxes can be estimated. Uncertainty quantification using hierarchical statistical models is critical at all stages.

Bio:
Noel Cressie is Director of the Centre for Environmental Informatics in the National Institute for Applied Statistics Research Australia (NIASRA) and Distinguished Professor at the University of Wollongong. He is also Adjunct Professor at the University of Missouri, USA.

Cressie received his BSc (Hons) from the University of Western Australia and an MA and PhD from Princeton University, USA. His past appointments have been at The Flinders University of South Australia, Iowa State University, and The Ohio State University. He has published four books and more than 250 papers in peer-reviewed outlets, in areas that include spatial and spatio-temporal statistics, empirical-Bayesian and Bayesian methods, and remote sensing.

Cressie is an elected Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the Spatial Econometrics Association.

The presentation is to be followed by afternoon tea and networking opportunity

Hacky Hour

Date: November 7, 2018

Time: 3pm - 4pm

Location: Library Makerspace, Level 5

Hacky Hour

Hacky Hour is a weekly meetup designed to help build a community around data and/or computing driven research. Everyone is welcome to drop-in to work on problems related to code, data, or digital tools in a social environment.

We have weekly lightning talks about various topics and regular guest visits from Pawsey and to sweeten the deal we will provide biscuits as well.

Follow @CUHackyHour for updates and info on guests and talk topics.

No RSVP necessary, just rock up!

RNT November 2018

Date: November 6, 2018

Time: 2pm - 3pm

Location: B216:204 - Innovation Central Perth

RNT November 2018

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regulary joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

CIC Seminar October 2018

Date: October 24, 2018

Time: 2pm - 3pm

Location: Meeting room B100.225

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CIC Seminar October 2018

Dr Paul Hancock presents

Space situational awareness with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA)”

Abstract:
The MWA is a low-frequency radio telescope located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia, and the project is led by the Curtin Institute for Radio Astronomy (CIRA). The MWA is one of four precursor telescopes for the much larger Square Kilometre Array project. This year saw the expansion of the array from 128 tiles to 256 tiles allowing the array to be reconfigurable from a compact to extended layout. The MWA was primarily designed to detect the signature of the Epoch of Re-ionisation (EOR), an important phase change in the history of the Universe. The flexibility of the MWA means that many other science projects are using the instrument, and even some projects that are more focused on Earth and Space science. In this talk I’ll give an outline of the MWA as a telescope, some of the main science areas, but with a focus on two main projects: looking for radio emission from Fireballs, and detecting space debris using passive radar.

Bio:

Dr Hancock obtained a PhD in astrophysics from the University of Sydney. During his Honors and PhD projects, Paul developed a lot of the software required to process data from new hardware attached to the Australia Telescope Compact Array, in order to image the entire southern sky at 20GHz. Since this early crossover between radio astronomy and software development Paul has gone on to develop: new observing and processing techniques to explore radio emission from dying stars, software to support radio surveys via accurate and efficient source finding, new processing techniques for large area sky surveys, and workflows to automate the calibration, imaging, and analysis of radio images in order to detect transient events.

 

The presentation will be followed by afternoon tea and a networking opportunity