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Upcoming Events

In light of the ever changing COVID-19 situation we have cancelled upcoming face-to-face events until July. We are working on moving events to online meetings where possible, so please do check back regularly.

 

RNT August 2020

Date: August 13, 2020

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

RNT August 2020

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regularly joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

RNT September 2020

Date: September 10, 2020

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

RNT September 2020

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regularly joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

RNT October 2020

Date: October 8, 2020

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

RNT October 2020

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regularly joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

RNT November 2020

Date: November 12, 2020

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

RNT November 2020

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regularly joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

December 2020 Software Carpentry Workshop – Python and R

Start date: December 2, 2020

End date: December 4, 2020

Time: 9 am - 5 pm

Location: Curtin University, Bentley Campus

The course is aimed at postgraduate students and researchers who want to learn more about automation and reproducibility of their research. You don’t need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Course Content:

  • Introduction to the Unix Shell
  • Introduction to version control (using Git)
  • Data analysis and visualisation in Python
  • Data analysis and visualisation in R

Registration is required- Registration will open ~2 months prior to the workshop.

Sign up to our mailing list to be notified when workshop registration is available: https://tinyurl.com/CIC-mail-list

 


Past Events

If you are interested in any further information on our past events feel free to contact the CIC team.

May 2020 Virtual Data Carpentry Workshop – Python

Start date: May 27, 2020

End date: May 28, 2020

Time: 8:45 am - 12:30 pm

Location: Online

May 2020 Virtual Data Carpentry Workshop – Python

We are offering free registration to a virtual Data Carpentry Workshop in Python, held from 8.45 am – 12:30 pm on the mornings of Wednesday May 27 and Thursday May 28.

Registration is free, but if you can no longer attend please refund your ticket so we may offer the place to someone else (places are limited).

The course is aimed at postgraduate students and researchers who want to learn more about automation and reproducibility of their research. You don’t need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Course Content:

  • Data analysis and visualisation in Python

April 2020 One day Virtual Data Carpentry Workshop – R

Date: April 22, 2020

Time: 9 am - 5 pm

Location: Online

April 2020 One day Virtual Data Carpentry Workshop – R

Due to COVID-19 social distancing requirements, our planned 3 day in-person workshop has been cancelled. In its place, we would like to offer free registration to a trial one-day virtual Data Carpentry Workshop held on April 22 2020.

Registration is free, but if you can no longer attend please refund your ticket so we may offer the place to someone else (places are limited).

The course is aimed at postgraduate students and researchers who want to learn more about automation and reproducibility of their research. You don’t need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Course Content:

  • Data analysis and visualisation in R

RNT March 2020

Date: March 12, 2020

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

RNT March 2020

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regularly joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

February CIC Research Seminar 2

Date: February 25, 2020

Time: 1:00-2:00pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2, Room 204 Curtin University, Kent St Bentley

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February CIC Research Seminar 2

The Promise of Learning Analytics and the Search for Evidence

Presented by Prof Dirk Ifenthale

Abstract:

Since a decade, the potentials of learning analytics for educational organisations have been discussed, however, there remains a lack of organisation-wide examples demonstrating a systematic and holistic adoption of learning analytics. Accordingly, actionable frameworks and adoption models focusing on learning analytics are required for successful integration of learning analytics systems into educational organisations.

Current research and practice shows that higher education organisations are aware of learning analytics and start experimenting with dashboards for students and teachers, however, they are far from organisational transformation. Hence, rigorous empirical evidence on the successful usage of learning analytics for supporting and improving students’ learning and success in higher education is still lacking.

A recent systematic review with an initial set of 6,220 articles and a final sample including 46 key publications will be discussed. The findings obtained suggest that there are a considerable number of learning analytics approaches which utilise effective techniques in supporting study success and at-risk students of dropping out.

Despite the high interest, the adoption of learning analytics in educational organisations requires capabilities not yet fully realised.

Bio:

Dirk Ifenthaler is Professor and Chair of Learning, Design and Technology at University of Mannheim, Germany and UNESCO Deputy Chair of Data Science in Higher Education Learning and Teaching at Curtin University, Australia.

Dirk’s research focuses on the intersection of cognitive psychology, educational technology, data analytics, and organisational learning. His research outcomes include numerous co-authored books, book series, book chapters, journal articles, and international conference papers, as well as successful grant funding in Australia, Germany, and USA.

He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Technology, Knowledge and Learning, Senior Editor of Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, and Deputy Editor-in-Chief of International Journal of Learning Analytics and Artificial Intelligence for Education.

The one hour presentation will be followed by a networking opportunity.

RNT February 2020

Date: February 13, 2020

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2

RNT February 2020

Our monthly Research Networking Tea (RNT) offers a great opportunity for researchers to hear about updates and news relating to the CIC while enjoying a spread of cakes and healthy snacks. The RNT is also regularly joined by Innovation Central staff and visitors from e.g. CSIRO

February CIC Research Seminar

Date: February 5, 2020

Time: 1:00-2:00pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 level 2, Room 204 Curtin University, Kent St Bentley

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February CIC Research Seminar

Catching Crooks with Bayes Nets: Using Bayesian Networks to identify significant crime events

Presented by Mr Shih Ching Fu

Abstract:

Police globally have invested heavily in curating accurate crime data on their respective jurisdictions. Anecdotally however, senior officers are spending proportionally more and more time wading through these new lakes of data and proportionally less time making timely policing decisions.

As an example, the Daily Crime Review, delivered to the WA Deputy Commissioner of Police every morning, comprises a 15 minute verbal briefing from his staff officer outlining the significant criminal incidents from the past 24 hours. Incidents mentioned in this briefing are judged significant based on details such as the suspects and victims involved, harm inflicted on officers, and perceived threat to community safety. Currently, the preparation of this Daily Crime Review takes more than 60 minutes; an onerous task since the backgrounds of around 600 criminal incidents must be reviewed, contextualised, and synthesised each morning by hand.

In this talk I’ll describe our Bayesian belief network for modelling crime incident significance, as perceived by the Deputy Commissioner. Our model attempts to encapsulate the intuition of the officers who routinely prepare the Daily Crime Review as they screen incidents; discovering their thought processes through structured and unstructured interviewing and observation. In testing, the resultant model rapidly classifies approximately three quarters of incidents as ‘insignificant’ therefore saving staff officers the effort of delving any deeper into those incidents. Planning is underway to further refine this model and eventually develop an app accessible to officers.

 

Bio:

Shih Ching is a Masters student in Mathematics at Curtin University who in 2019 undertook a project with WA Police, the subject of this presentation.

With a background in computer science, he’s returned to study statistics after a varied career in academic research, enterprise software development, and product management at a tech start-up. His newly discovered zeal for applied statistics means he’s super keen to learn new techniques and work on cross-disciplinary projects. Bayesian networks are his latest fixation but logistic regression is his first love.

When off campus, his time is normally distributed between his children, wife, and his 3-iron.

The presentation will be followed with a networking opportunity.

CIC Research Symposium 2019

Date: December 12, 2019

Time: 9:30 am - 12:30 pm

Location: Curtin University, Building 200A, Room 220, Bentley

CIC Research Symposium 2019

The CIC is running its second research symposium showcasing the research being undertaken within the institute. The symposium is a great opportunity for CIC members and the wider university and industry community to find out about the wide variety of research being enabled by the CIC. This morning event consists of presentations that have been tailored for a general audience, visually compelling demos in the HIVE, and morning tea where you can engage with the CIC research community.

9.30am – 10.30am Welcome & Presentations (200A.220)

10.30am – 11.30am Demos and Morning Tea (HIVE)

11.30am – 12.30pm Presentations (200A.220)

December CIC Research Seminar

Date: December 10, 2019

Time: 1:30 - 3:00 pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth, Building 216 Room 204, Curtin University, Bentley Campus

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December CIC Research Seminar

Data Science Education

Presented by Prof Linda McIver

 

Abstract:

There’s a huge push to engage school kids with STEM. Too often this means playing with toys or “solving” hypothetical problems.

Data Science gives us the perfect opportunity to empower kids to solve real problems using STEM skills. Kids learn that STEM skills are tools they can use to make their world a better place.

In this talk I’ll give you the origin story of the Australian Data Science Education Institute (ADSEI) – a registered charity aimed at bringing STEM to all Australian students. I’ll describe some of the projects we have developed, and how you can use our Data Science resources and ideas in your own Education and Outreach efforts (for free!).

Bio:

Founder and Executive Director of the Australian Data Science Education Institute, Dr Linda McIver started out as an Academic with a PhD in Computer Science Education. When it became apparent that High School teaching was a lot more fun, Linda began a highly successful career at John Monash Science School, where she built innovative courses in Computational and Data Science for year 10 and year 11 students.

Nominated as one of the inaugural Superstars of STEM in 2017, Linda is passionate about creating authentic project experiences to motivate all students to become technologically and data literate.

While Linda loves the classroom, it was rapidly becoming clear that teachers in the Australian School system were keen to embrace Data Science, but that there was a serious lack of resources to support that. That’s why Linda created ADSEI – to support Data Science in education.

The one hour presentation will be followed by a networking opportunity

December 2019 Software Carpentry Workshop – Python and R

Start date: December 4, 2019

End date: December 6, 2019

Time: 9am-5pm

Location: Curtin University, Bentley Campus

December 2019 Software Carpentry Workshop – Python and R

The course is aimed at postgraduate students and researchers who want to learn more about automation and reproducibility of their research. You don’t need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Course Content:

  • Introduction to the Unix Shell
  • Introduction to version control (using Git)
  • Data analysis and visualisation in Python
  • Data analysis and visualisation in R

November CIC Research Seminar 2

Date: November 20, 2019

Time: 3:00 - 4:30 pm

Location: Innovation Central Perth - Building 216 Room 204, Level 2 Curtin University, Bentley Campus

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November CIC Research Seminar 2

Artificial Intelligence – perception, expectations, and reality

Presented by Prof Lars Nolle

Abstract:

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has become part of the modern pop culture and is featured in many science fiction books or films, often together with evil robots or artificial lifeforms. This led to a certain perception of AI in the general public, frequently associated with menace and loss of control. Based on that perception, even well respected scientists and entrepreneurs from non-AI backgrounds, like Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk, have warned that AI poses a threat to our very existence. In contrast, there are technology evangelists who now sell AI as the solution to all our problems. This again changed the perception of AI in the general public and increased the expectations people have. As a result, even big technology companies started to use the term Artificial Intelligence as a marketing buzzword, highlighting capabilities instead of threats. There is a huge gap between AI as perceived by laymen and what is actually happening in the AI community. In this talk we shall look at the different interpretations of the term AI before discussing potential dangers, threats and capabilities of Artificial Intelligence.

Bio:

Lars Nolle graduated from the University of Applied Science and Arts in Hanover, Germany, with a degree in Computer Science and Electronics. He obtained a Postgraduate Diploma in Software and Systems Security and an MSc in Software Engineering from the University of Oxford as well as an MSc in Computing and a PhD in Applied Computational Intelligence from The Open University.

He worked in the software industry before joining The Open University as a Research Fellow. Subsequently, he became a Senior Lecturer in Computing at Nottingham Trent University and is now a Professor of Applied Computer Science at Jade University of Applied Sciences.

After serving two years as Associated Dean of Research, Lars is currently Dean of Studies at the Department of Engineering Sciences. He is also currently President of the European Council of Modelling and Simulation. Lars’ main research interests are artificial intelligence methods for real-world scientific and engineering applications

The one hour presentation will be followed by a networking opportunity.